Archie 

Feedback from Sue (Archie's human):-

Archie has regular routine maintenance sessions partly due to his age and also because he is increasing his workload coming out of winter in readiness for his first ODE as part of the Willberry Wonder Pony Wobbleberries Challenge.

Sarah came to visit my horse Archie. I felt something was not right and wanted to find out if he had any issues with his back and if not he was due a massage. Archie is 21 this year, an ID standing at roughly 16.3. He is high withered and I had felt for some time that his saddle was not a good fit. Sarah looks at horses as a whole entity and I was impressed with how she approached him, asked him to respond to her and the treatment itself. I was left with a very relaxed and happy horse, having had it confirmed it was indeed his saddle that was hurting him and a full report, including an assessment of his movement, sore areas and advice on how to stretch and massage him myself as well as the best exercise to help him become stronger and work through from his back end better. I would highly recommend Sarah and I am looking forward to her next follow up visit.

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                                         Paddy

Feedback from Wendy (Paddy's human):-

Paddy had a disagreement with a barbed wire fence. The wound was cleaned and stapled by the vet and Wendy used Photizo Light Therapy for 7 days all around the site of the wound and over the top of the wound.

Essential oils and herbs to help with wound healing, pain relief and to reduce inflammation were offered during the initial therapy session and those that were selected were left with the owner to continue to use during the week.

Two weeks later when the staples were removed, the vet was amazed at how quickly the wound had healed and the owner was able to get back on board and ride 2-3 weeks earlier than expected.

I called Sarah when my beloved cob, Paddy, cut himself while on turnout. It was a nasty cut; a wire cut over a foot long, 1-1.5cm deep and right where my leg aids should be. (And on Paddy, a lot of leg aids are needed!). The vet had been out to clean the cut and Paddy now had 38 staples in his side. Given the location of the injury, I wanted to do everything possible to ensure a full recovery with no lingering soreness. I knew Sarah had been trained in many different therapies so I thought I'd contact her to see if she could help make Paddy more comfortable and speed up his recovery. 


Sarah spent 1.5 hours with Paddy doing a range of therapies. He had fun with the herbal choices and showed that actually he doesn't just eat anything as I'd thought but had a significant 'hunger' for certain tastes. 


But it was the Photizo┬« Light Therapy that Sarah said would be the biggest benefit. I first thought it was all a bit weird but was willing to be open minded given I wanted to do what I could to help this injury heal. I also figured that I know ultrasound works but I don't actually see it do much so maybe this Light Therapy was something similar? It was obvious that Paddy liked it. He calmed and showed lots of signs of contentment. But most noticeably he kind of lifted his back and rounded himself but in a very relaxed way like having a big stretch that pulls every muscle in your back straight.

I loaned the Photizo from Sarah for a week so that I could continue the therapy myself when Paddy was at his most sore. The difference in a week was significant. The wound healed nicely and all sensitivity disappeared. The vet who treated Paddy initially had said that as it was such as nasty injury it would be unlikely that he'd be under saddle for 4-6 weeks, that the would most likely scar, and some sensitivity would probably remain. Two weeks after the drama Paddy had his staples removed. Two days later we were riding. One week on and we were having lessons. It is like the accident never happened.

I don't really understand how the light therapy works but I believe it contributed to this speedy recovery. There is still a slight scar now but it I smaller every week and I think this is due to having treated the wound carefully from the start.

While I had the Photizo I also tried it on my Sec A companion who is a rather aloof chap. Mouse normally hates being handled but he'd walk up to me for his Photizo session and show signs of deep relaxation while I worked on his back. Normally he'd run a mile when handled too much but during this week he just fell asleep during every treatment. As well as the licking, chewing and then snoring, he also rounded his back in that big long stretch the same as Paddy had done. It was nice to be able to give him some time and attention. 

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Ginger (rescued by The Society for the Welfare of Horses and Ponies)

Ginger is a lovely sweet natured mare who was rescued by The Society for the Welfare of Horses and Ponies, Monmouth. When they found her, she was in a lot of pain and unable to walk properly due to her long hooves and severe laminitis. X-rays showed that her pedal bones had rotated. 


She was on box rest for a long time whilst the lovely people at SWHP nursed her back into good health and their farrier undertook the massive job of improving her feet. Due to her trying to escape the pain and compensating for having long hooves, Ginger changed the way she walked and so this had an effect on her muscles and joints. 


I see Ginger every 2 weeks and mostly use fascial release, massage, red light therapy and a tuning fork. There is still a lot of tension and tightness to unwind - a bit like peeling an onion, but she is making progress and after just 3 sessions the farrier noticed how much better she was moving her shoulders and forelimbs, making it much easier for her to hold her feet up to be shod. 


She loves her therapy sessions and comes to greet me as soon as I arrive, but very quickly into the session, she often falls asleep or dozes with her eyes open!!!!

Feedback from SWHP - we have seen such a good response from the horses being treated since Sarah has been here and the horses really seem to enjoy it.

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Curly (rescued by The Society for the Welfare of Horses and Ponies)

Curly is a young feral Welsh Mountain pony and was rescued by The Society for the Welfare of Horses and Ponies in July 2016. When she was rescued, her hooves were so long they had curled up and over (hence the name), she was riddled with worms, extremely emaciated to the point she could not eat hard feed and her herd had left her. At some point, she had also had a foal, but no-one is sure exactly how long this was before she was rescued.


Just one week after she was rescued, she had a herbal choices session to help her come to terms with all that had happened to her and to help her to heal and progress, both physically and emotionally. These photos are from that session, (which lasted around 90 minutes). 


As Curly was not used to being handled by or being around humans, the yard manager kept her in a head collar and long lead to begin with, but eventually the lead rope was removed as Curly became braver and accepting of us being in her stable.  

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Snicky

Feedback from Gillian (Snicky's human):-

Snicky has asymmetrical muscle development, swings his right hind out and crosses his front legs over in walk and trot. 


He has had some time off due to laminitis, but has been gradually brought back into work over 12 months and is happily hacking out, but he does experience stiffness and tension throughout his body, poll and jaw and sometimes suffers from anxiety.


During this session, he benefitted from a few essential oils, fascial release, massage, joint mobilisations, stretches and red light therapy. 

Sarah came out to treat my horse Snicker who had a history of EMS and laminitis and a tendency to be stiff in his hind quarters.
Due to Sarah being able to offer several types of treatment I felt that this was ideal as she could assess which treatment or combination of treatments might be most suitable.

Sarah started off assessing Snicker in walk and trot in order to watch how he moved and then began the session by offering Snicker a selection of oils. It was thoroughly interesting to see which ones he selected and was drawn to. Within minutes Snicker was very relaxed and seemed very content.

Sarah then progressed to some fascial release treatment which made Snicker thoroughly relax and he responded amazingly well. Sarah also decided to do some joint mobilisation towards the end of the session and when Snicker showed a walk and trot up again at the end of the session he was so much straighter than the start of the session. We looked at the before and after video footage of Snickers walk and it was very interesting to see the difference. Initially he was plaiting more in front but was much straighter after his treatment.

I love that Sarah can offer a variety of treatments according to what she thinks would be best for the horse which is quite unique and a lovely experience for the horse too.

Sarah has a very friendly and professional approach in her work and my horse really relaxed with her throughout the session. It was so nice to see my horse really relaxing, enjoying and benefiting from his session. Thank you Sarah

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